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Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End

Feature and Contest

Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End

Full of eye-opening research and riveting storytelling, BEING MORTAL asserts that medicine can comfort and enhance our experience even to the end, providing not only a good life but also a good end. Gawande, a practicing surgeon, addresses his profession's ultimate limitation, arguing that quality of life is the desired goal for patients and families. Gawande offers examples of freer, more socially fulfilling models for assisting the infirm and dependent elderly, and he explores the varieties of hospice care to demonstrate that a person's last weeks or months may be rich and dignified.
 
Click here to read more about the book and enter the contest.

Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End
by Atul Gawande

Win 10 Copies of
BEING MORTAL
by Atul Gawande
For Your Group

We are celebrating the #1 New York Times bestselling BEING MORTAL --- doctor Atul Gawande's meditation on death, modern medicine and what matters most in the end --- with a special contest that will give 35 groups the chance to win 10 copies. To enter, please fill out this form by Wednesday, February 8th at noon ET. We ask that winners will read, discuss and provide feedback on the book by Friday, April 28th, so please enter only if you are able to commit to that deadline with your group!

» If you are experiencing problems with the contest form, click here.

More about BEING MORTAL:
In BEING MORTAL, bestselling author Atul Gawande tackles the hardest challenge of his profession: how medicine can not only improve life but also the process of its ending

Medicine has triumphed in modern times, transforming birth, injury and infectious disease from harrowing to manageable. But in the inevitable condition of aging and death, the goals of medicine seem too frequently to run counter to the interest of the human spirit. Nursing homes, preoccupied with safety, pin patients into railed beds and wheelchairs. Hospitals isolate the dying, checking for vital signs long after the goals of cure have become moot. Doctors, committed to extending life, continue to carry out devastating procedures that in the end extend suffering.

Gawande, a practicing surgeon, addresses his profession's ultimate limitation, arguing that quality of life is the desired goal for patients and families. Gawande offers examples of freer, more socially fulfilling models for assisting the infirm and dependent elderly, and he explores the varieties of hospice care to demonstrate that a person's last weeks or months may be rich and dignified.

Full of eye-opening research and riveting storytelling, BEING MORTAL asserts that medicine can comfort and enhance our experience even to the end, providing not only a good life but also a good end.